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    1. Greenpeace protesters target Apple's Ireland HQ

      Greenpeace protesters target Apple's Ireland HQ

      Protesters from Greenpeace have targeted Apple's European HQ in Cork, Ireland, to publicise its How Clean is your Cloud report. Greenpeace launched the report earlier this week, singling out Apple, Amazon and Microsoft for criticism over electricity consumption by the data centres used by the tech giants. Apple has already rebuffed Greenpeace's accusations that its planned new facility in Maiden, North Carolina will only get 10 percent of its electricity from renewable energy sources such as fuel cells and solar arrays, with the rest generated by coal. Apple contests Greenpeace's coal-fired data center claims Cupertino said that 60 percent of the power will be eventually delivered on-site from a solar farm and fuel-cell installation "which will each be the largest in the country".

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    2. Volta To Build Reliable Data Centre In The Heart Of London

      Volta To Build Reliable Data Centre In The Heart Of London

      Specialist data centre developer Volta has today announced its first project in Central London– a flexible data centre space located in the old Reuters headquarters in Great Sutton Street. Situated in close proximity to the City, the West End, and a stone’s throw from the Silicon Roundabout in Shoreditch, the facility will provide sub-millisecond latency connections for surrounding financial and media industries. Volta is a combined real estate, infrastructure and IT business. Once the renovation of the building is complete, it will offer co-location services – resilient power and cooling for single or multiple server racks, and private caged data suites for especially security-conscious clients. The company doesn’t sell the servers – but it does pretty much everything else.

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    3. Amazon Receives Failing Grade in Greenpeace “How Green is Your Cloud” Report

      Amazon Receives Failing Grade in Greenpeace “How Green is Your Cloud” Report

      Environmental organization Greenpeace announced on Tuesday it has published its “How green is your cloud” report, which gave Amazon a failing grade for its lack of clean energy and not being transparent enough about the details of its cloud infrastructure. The report gives an interesting insight into the use of green technologies and resources among some of the largest hosting companies, or in Amazon’s case, a lack there of. For the report, Greenpeace assessed 14 of the largest IT companies in the world in the categories of energy transparency, infrastructure siting, energy efficiency and greenhouse-gas mitigation, and renewables and advocacy. It also gave a detailed look at each company’s use of coal, nuclear and clean energy, a category in which Apple and Amazon received the worst rankings.

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    4. Facebook, eBay Among Uptime Green IT Winners

      Facebook, eBay Among Uptime Green IT Winners

      eBay, Facebook and Verizon Wireless are among the winners in the The Uptime Institute’s 2012 Green Enterprise IT (GEIT) Awards, which recognize pioneering advancements for significantly improved energy productivity in IT and data center operations.. Recipients will share experiences and insights during the Uptime Institute Symposium in Santa Clara, California, on May 14-17, 2012. The theme of this year’s Symposium is Digital Infrastructure Convergence, with honorees’ case study presentations scheduled throughout. The GEIT awards are being sponsored by Sabey Data Centers.

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    5. Greenpeace slams Amazon over green datacentre efforts

      Greenpeace slams Amazon over green datacentre efforts

      In the How green is your cloud report, published on Tuesday, Greenpeace slammed Apple, Amazon and Microsoft for the meagre amount of clean energy their datacentres use and their "transparency" regarding their infrastructure. Amazon got the worst report card overall, while Google and Akamai were the only companies on the list to be awarded an A grade, for the use of renewable energy and advocacy of green technologies, and energy transparency, respectively. "Three of the largest IT companies building their business around the cloud — Amazon, Apple and Microsoft — are all rapidly expanding without adequate regard to source of electricity, and rely heavily on dirty energy to power their clouds," Greenpeace said in its report (PDF). "Yahoo and Google both continue to lead the sector in prioritising access to renewable energy in their cloud expansion, and both have become more active in supporting policies to drive greater renewable energy investment," it ...

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    6. Nirvanix Doubles Cloud Storage in Dallas with CyrusOne Data Center

      Nirvanix Doubles Cloud Storage in Dallas with CyrusOne Data Center

      Cloud storage services provider Nirvanix announced on Tuesday it has doubled its cloud storage capacity in the Dallas area through an agreement with colocation provider CyrusOne. The partnership signals a demand for cloud storage in the Dallas area. This certainly presents an opportunity to web hosting companies to partner with storage providers like Nirvanix to offer to their own customers. This marks Nirvanix’s second data center location in Dallas, with seven additional data centers in geographically diverse locations worldwide. CyrusOne plans to deliver the first statewide Internet exchange in the country, linking its Dallas, Houston, and San Antonio data centers to one another. All three data centers will be integrated with Nirvanix enterprise cloud storage to serve the data archive, backup and content collaboration needs of Fortune 1000 customers.

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      Mentions: LEED
    7. Salesforce Worst of ‘Dirty’ Cloud Companies, Greenpeace says

      Salesforce Worst of ‘Dirty’ Cloud Companies, Greenpeace says

      Salesforce, the world’s largest vendor of enterprise cloud computing, gets the worst ratings in a Greenpeace report that claims cloud computing companies are perpetuating the use of fossil fuel, while Apple has shown marked improvement from last year. The report, How Clean is Your Cloud?, compares energy choices from global IT and internet giants including Apple, Google and this year’s top performer, Yahoo. Greenpeace estimates that just four percent of Salesforce’s used power is drawn from renewable sources – less than the lowest percentage recorded in the 2011 report. Salesforce is a new addition in this year’s report. Apple, last year’s worst offender, improved the amount of energy it draws from renewable sources from 6.7 percent in 2011 to 15.3 percent in 2012. Apple now has the fifth-lowest score in the report. It leapfrogged Microsoft, IBM and Amazon.

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    8. Roundup: Sidera, Carpathia, Syska Hennessy

      Roundup: Sidera, Carpathia, Syska Hennessy

      Here’s our review of some of this week’s noteworthy links for the data center industry: Sidera Delivers Unique Path Between NY and Ashburn – Sidera Networks has enhanced its Transcom Route, which runs from New York to Washington, DC, to include a diverse path to its Ashburn, Va. data center fiber ring via Frederick, Md., bypassing downtown Washington, DC. The result is a unique and completely diverse path from traditional fiber routes along the I-95 corridor. This is welcome news for large financial, enterprise and carrier customers who wish to bypass major congestion points on the I-95 corridor in support of important data center, disaster recovery, and cloud application requirements. “Over the last couple of months, Sidera has been systematically connecting to all of the major data centers in the Ashburn area – one of the largest Internet content distribution points in the world and a major disaster recovery location ...

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    9. Compass Brings Wholesale Model to New Markets

      Compass Brings Wholesale Model to New Markets

      Can the “wholesale” data center leasing model, which has become popular in the biggest internet hubs, succeed in smaller markets? Compass Datacenters aims to find out. Compass, a new company based in Dallas, is planning to bring turn-key data centers to second-tier markets where demand is growing, but hasn’t yet reached the scale of historic data center strongholds like Silicon Valley or northern Virginia. The company says it is optimizing its data center design to fit the demand profile of smaller markets, while deploying its development capital in an efficient manner.

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      Mentions: LEED
    10. How Clean is Your Cloud? - Apple responds

      How Clean is Your Cloud? - Apple responds

      Our new report “How Clean is Your Cloud” is out today – to show that the massive increase in Internet use is mainly being powered by dirty energy. Apple, Amazon and Microsoft all score badly in the report for relying on dirty coal and dangerous nuclear power for their data centers. Since 2010 and again in 2011 we have been calling on all the major internet companies to come clean about the amount and type of power behind the internet services we use everyday.

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    11. Greenpeace sticks to its guns over iCloud report

      Greenpeace sticks to its guns over iCloud report

      Apple's fighting back against claims that its newest data-center is a coal-guzzling blight on the planet - but Greenpeace isn't convinced. In a report released yesterday, Greenpeace slated Apple's new facility in Maiden, North Carolina, claiming it would draw about 100 megawatts of electricity and that 90 percent of its power was generated by coal. Apple's disputing these figures. It says the data center will consume only 20 megawatts, and that eventually 60 percent of the power will be delivered by an on-site solar farm. But Greenpeace isn't giving up, pointing to the scale of Apple's investment in the plant and its physical size as signs that the company isn't telling the truth.

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    12. Two Views on Apple's Coal-Powered Data Center

      Two Views on Apple's Coal-Powered Data Center

      Apple is feeling heat from Greenpeace today. The environmental group singled out the image-conscious IT leader for building data centers in regions that rely heavily on coal in its yearly report rankings of cloud computing companies. Apple gets 55 percent of its power from coal, according to Greenpeace, which is about the same as the nation’s overall energy mix, but higher than all other 14 ranked companies. More and more, West Coast tech companies are building their U.S. facilities on the east coast and around Chicago, where coal power is plentiful and cheap. Greenpeace criticized Apple because it has no data center policy that takes clean energy into account. The company got an “F” grade for infrastructure siting as its iCloud data center rises in Maiden, North Carolina, where the local utility Duke Energy relies mostly on coal and nuclear power. Apple, shot back in a statement calling ...

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    13. Apple slaps back at Greenpeace for dirty-cloud report

      Apple slaps back at Greenpeace for dirty-cloud report

      A day after being criticized by Greenpeace for its energy practices, Apple said Greenpeace's estimates for power use at the company's latest data center are much too high. Apple said that its data center now under construction in North Carolina will use about 20 megawatts at full capacity. Greenpeace put the estimate at 100 megawatts. Greenpeace gave Apple, Amazon, and other companies low marks for locating their data centers in areas that rely heavily on coal and "dangerous nuclear." Those companies also scored lower than competitors, including Google and Yahoo, because they disclose less information on energy use. Before publishing its report yesterday, Greenpeace shared its estimate for the power Apple's North Carolina power plant would use based on the size of the investment and size of the facility. Apple (and Amazon) told Greenpeace the number was incorrect but didn't offer a more accurate number.

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    14. Greenpeace Gives Apple, Amazon Low Marks for 'Dirty' Clouds

      Greenpeace Gives Apple, Amazon Low Marks for 'Dirty' Clouds

      A Tuesday Greenpeace report that studied the environmental impact of the cloud criticized firms like Apple, Microsoft, Twitter, and Amazon for lagging behind their Web counterparts. The firms, however, took issue with that characterization. Amazon, Apple, and Microsoft "are all rapidly expanding without adequate regard to source of electricity, and rely heavily on dirty energy to power their clouds," Greenpeace said in its report, dubbed "How Clean Is Your Cloud?" Facebook, which has tangled with Greenpeace in the past, earned high praise from the group for committing to renewable energy, particular with its new data center in Sweden. Greenpeace also lauded Google and Yahoo for "prioritizing access to renewable energy in their cloud expansion, and [becoming] more active in supporting policies to drive greater renewable energy investment."

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    15. Apple's Cloud Technology Fueled by Coal

      Apple's Cloud Technology Fueled by Coal

      In the cloud, Apple is known as a gross polluter. And the other high-tech giants didn't fare much better. Greenpeace has issued a report on cloud technology energy use and named Apple as one of the study's worst polluters, with 55 percent of its data center power coming from coal plants and 27.8 percent from nuclear reactors. The environmental group scored the companies based on energy transparency, infrastructure siting, energy efficiency and renewables/advocacy. Apple earned a D- for its overall environmental score. Facebook received a C, namely because of little energy transparency, while Google fared a little better with a B average, largely because of its commitment to renewable energy.

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    16. Amazon Web Services

      Most of the time I write about the challenges posed by scaling infrastructure.  Today, though, I wanted mention some upcoming events that have to do with a different sort of scale. In Amazon Web Services we are tackling lots of really hairy challenges as we build out one the world’s largest cloud computing platforms.  From data center design, to network architecture, to data persistence, to high-performance computing  and beyond we have a virtually limitless set of  problems needing to be solved.  Over the coming years AWS will be blazing new trails in virtually every aspect of computing and infrastructure. In order to tackle these opportunities we are searching for innovative technologists to join the AWS team.  In other words we need to scale our engineering staff.  AWS has hundreds of open positions throughout the organization.  Every single AWS team is hiring including EC2, S3, EBS, EMR, CloudFront, RDS, DynamoDB ...

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    17. How Clean is your Cloud - Apple responds

      How Clean is your Cloud - Apple responds

      Our new report “How Clean is Your Cloud” is out today - to show that the massive increase in Internet use is mainly being powered by dirty energy. Apple, Amazon and Microsoft all score badly in the report for relying on dirty coal and dangerous nuclear power for their data centres. Since 2010, and again in 2011, we have been calling on all the major Internet companies to come clean about the amount and type of power behind the Internet services we use everyday. Today Apple responded (via the New York Times): In a statement issued in response to the report, Apple disclosed for the first time that the data center would consume about 20 million watts at full capacity - much lower than Greenpeace's estimate, which is 100 million watts. In territory served by Duke, a million watts is enough to power 750 to 1,000 homes. Kristin Huguet, a ...

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    18. Apple Defends iCloud Against Greenpeace Attack

      Apple Defends iCloud Against Greenpeace Attack

      Apple made public information about its data centre energy consumption today after a damning report by Greenpeace. The report rated Apple among the worst cloud computing companies, judging by their energy consumption. Greenpeace accused Apple of contributing to the carbon pollution by using coal energy to power its North Carolina data centre, which supports the iCloud service.

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    19. Colocation America Targets Data Centers, VOIP Firms with Partnership Program

      Colocation America Targets Data Centers, VOIP Firms with Partnership Program

      Web hosting and colocation provider Colocation America announced last week it has extended its channel partnership program to develop strategic alliances in various industries and to expand its ability to expand its service offerings. The extension of the program will target companies within the data center industry, VOIP services industry, and new market ventures. Each partner is backed by Colocation America’s 100 percent uptime, 24-hour support, and 22 data centers. Colocation America recently partnered with firewall management service provider Dome9, which the company said was highly successful for both companies in the last few months as many of Colocation America’s clients expressed their happiness with the option to add a trusted firewall solution to their servers.

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    20. How Colocation Providers Manage Energy Efficiency

      How Colocation Providers Manage Energy Efficiency

      If your data center involves only company property (from the building to the infrastructure to the servers and other IT equipment), then you have complete control of every aspect of your implementation—energy efficiency is entirely up to you. But if you’re a colocation provider, then you are somewhat at the mercy of your customers, who may not have the same emphasis on energy efficiency. That doesn’t mean your facility is doomed to a life as an energy wastrel. Colocation providers can still take a number of steps to ensure efficiency, many of which are the same as those that other data centers take. Focus on Infrastructure Colocation providers, as such, are primarily focused on supplying data center infrastructure to customers—not so much on IT equipment and operations. As a result, this is the area in which they have the most control of their facilities’ energy efficiency ...

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      Mentions: ASHRAE
    21. Microsoft Wants Data Centres To Power Themselves

      Microsoft Wants Data Centres To Power Themselves

      Microsoft wants to change how the industry powers data centres by integrating them with full-scale power plants, two company executives wrote in a blog post yesterday. According to Christian Belady, general manager of data centre services, and Vijay Gill, senior director of network engineering, data centres of the future will feature renewable power generation on the premises, completely eliminating transmission losses. Data into energy Today, Microsoft’s cloud supports more than one billion customers and 20 million businesses in 76 countries. Its data centres are powered by one of the world’s largest fibre optic backbones, providing more than 3.5 terabits per second of capacity to more than 1200 networks.

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      Mentions: Microsoft Corp
    22. Iceland's National Power Company Offers Data Centers the Most Competitive Power Prices in Europe

      Iceland's National Power Company Offers Data Centers the Most Competitive Power Prices in Europe

      Landsvirkjun, Iceland's national power company has announced its aim to power 1% of the European datacenter industry with electricity from renewable hydroelectric and geothermal sources by the year 2020. The estimated electric energy needed to achieve this target is around 1.5 TWh, about 10% of the company's current generation. The ambition is based on Iceland's ample renewable power development opportunities and the fact that the country has been attracting considerable datacenter industry investment drawn by the compelling power proposition, solid infrastructure, and world-class business environment. Landsvirkjun's power proposition is to provide the most competitive energy prices in Europe. Recent public quotes from the company offer fixed real rates of $43/MWh in 12 year contracts. In comparison, European average real market rates were from $65/MWh in 2011 on short term contracts with prices expected to increase considerably over the coming decade. In addition, Iceland ...

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    23. Verizon shows off OpenFlow’s benefits for carriers

      Verizon shows off OpenFlow’s benefits for carriers

      Verizon has created a partnership with Intel, HP and networking company Adara to help test and understand the benefits that OpenFlow and software defined networks could have on its business. The nation’s largest wireless carrier has been a supporter of OpenFlow, and is a founding member of the Open Networking Foundation. The end goal for the carrier is to use software defined networks to eliminate some costly complexity from its network. Verizon’s demonstration, done on HP gear that uses Adara’s technology (HP is a commercializing Adara’s networking software for the enterprise), highlights how OpenFlow could be used to deliver personalized consumer services, such as personalized data plans. The demo is running at the Open Networking Summit being held this week in Santa Clara, Calif. Verizon is also demonstrating how to move large amounts of data through its network and from one data center to another, which ...

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      Mentions: Intel Google
    24. New Microsoft GFS Site Highlights Best Practices

      New Microsoft GFS Site Highlights Best Practices

      The network supporting online services for Microsoft can provide up to 3.5 terabits of capacity to deliver content to end users, the company said today. The new details about the company’s network infrastructure were included in an updated web site launched this morning for Global Foundation Services, which builds and operates Microsoft’s data center network. The site, which provides significant details about Microsoft’s infrastructure, reflects a growing industry trend to be more open about aspects of data centers that were once closely-held secrets. Built on Windows Azure, the new GFS web site showcases Microsoft’s best practices, and features videos in which Microsoft engineers provide deep dives into the company’s approach to data center operations, efficiency and security.

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      Mentions: Microsoft Corp
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