1. Green Data Center News

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    1. little bits of greener chips - by Doug Mohney

      little bits of greener chips - by Doug Mohney
      Chip and sensor manufacturers are pursuing a variety of tactics to make the next generation of IT hardware more "green" beyond the usual practice of simply cranking out the latest designs on a smaller fabrication process. Teridian Semiconductor (www.teridian.com) provides chips to be incorporated into servers, power meters, power strips, and power supplies – as well more mundane applications like Ye Olde HVAC and power distribution units. Monitoring is provided for AC line voltages, frequency and load current and the company is building in hooks to its chips to support networking standards like ZigBee and HomePlug. A typical chip prices around $2.89 in quantities of 100 and consumes about 25 milliwatts in operation.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney IBM
    2. Can Bell Labs really cut network power by 1000 - by Peter Judge

      Can Bell Labs really cut network power by 1000 - by Peter Judge
      It's tempting to think that the Green Touch initiative is more about getting good publicity for Alcatel Lucent, than about reducing greenhouse emissions. But on balance, I think that would be unfair to the project. The consortium, which emerged this week from discussions at Bell Labs, Alcatel Lucent's research arm, and has set itself the goal of creating technology in five years, which can reduce the emissions caused by the world's data networks, by a factor of 1000. That's an aim no-one could fault, but a lot of people looking at the announcement will be well aware that most news stories about Alcatel Lucent, a merged company dubbed by the Financial Times as a poster child for much that is wrong in the telecoms equipment industry. When Alcatel and Lucent merged in 2006, the company was worth €30bn. Last week it was worth around €5.6bn ...
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      Mentions: Peter Judge MIT At&T
    3. How Economizers and Related Monitoring Tools Can Save You Money and Increase Reliability - by Paula Bernier

      How Economizers and Related Monitoring Tools Can Save You Money and Increase Reliability - by Paula Bernier
      People used to think about data centers as locations in need of very tight control over temperature and humidity. While climate control is clearly still key, in the past five years data center operators have broadened the window of what’s acceptable in terms of temperatures and humidity. At the same time, we’ve seen the introduction of new devices to monitor and, in some cases, automatically adjust temperature, humidity and airflow. These devices, sometimes referred to as economizers, can save data center operators and their tenants money by increasing energy efficiency and, in some cases, allowing for the use of outside air for cooling, notes Equinix CTO Dave Pickut.
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      Mentions: Paula Bernier
    4. Bringing Intelligence, Control to the data center beast - By Paula Bernier

      Bringing Intelligence, Control to the data center beast - By Paula Bernier
      Data centers last year consumed something like $23 billion worldwide on electricity. And that’s increasing by about 15 percent each year, according to reports. On the up side, however, power-hungry data centers are slowly becoming more intelligent and controllable beasts. That’s in large part because suppliers of data center solutions are paying more attention to the energy and environmental costs of these animals and providing solutions to tame them.
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      Mentions: Paula Bernier
    5. What are you Green Data Resolutions? - By Peter Judge

      What are you Green Data Resolutions?  - By Peter Judge
      If you are a data centre manager who wants to deliver sustainable and efficient services, you might be feeling a bit low right now. Apart from the post-holiday blues, you're entering another year when resources are still scarce - a lot of countries are still in recession, and even those pulling out have a long way to go. So IT budgets will be tight, and you will be asked to deliver on new projects and services. You'll also be at the heart of moves to make your organisation more sustainable - just at the moment when the failed Copenhagen summit has made it quite clear that no-one, right up to the highest level of government, wants to face up to the real challenges that will involve. So, what are your resolutions for 2010 going to be? Here's half a dozen ideas that might be on your list...
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      Mentions: Peter Judge
    6. Outsourcing data center may be the greenest path - By Doug Mohney

      Outsourcing data center may be the greenest path  - By Doug Mohney
      If businesses can manage to get through the hurdles of outsourcing data center operations to co-location, hosted and/or cloud-based services, the results are likely to be more "green" than trying to build new data centers from scratch – a temptation that many companies are facing as they look at a run on capacity in the next few years. About half the companies running data centers between 5,000 and 50,000 square feet – in the "Mid-sized" range – expect that they're going to run out of power in 18 months, says Ted Ritter, a senior research analyst at Nemertes Research. Ironically, companies running small and very large data centers seem to be just right when it comes to power consumption, according to the data Nemertes has collected on sustainable data center operations.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    7. If IT Steps up to the carbon challenge who pays? - By Peter Judge

      If IT Steps up to the carbon challenge who pays?  - By Peter Judge
      The UN's climate change summit in Copenhagen last week faced one big question - who pays for reducing emissions? The developing or the developed world? The US or China? To my surprise, the Green IT movement faces more or less the same question. Who pays? The issue of payment is a surprise in Green IT. Normally we hear that making IT sustainable is a benefit, not a cost. Reducing energy use reduces energy bills. In the last year, the whole IT industry, more or less, has converged on a single message around efficiency. Energy costs money, and new IT kit generally uses less energy than old IT kit, so buy lots of our new boxes http://www.eweekeurope.co.uk/news/dell-unleashes-cooler--cheaper-servers--473. You'll save money, and save the planet. It's an oversimplified message, clearly tailored for a recession, and it misses two obvious questions. Firstly you must take ...
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    8. When Copenhagen Ends lets get back to the basics - by Peter Judge

      When Copenhagen Ends lets get back to the basics - by Peter Judge
      At the mid-point of the Copenhagen climate change summit, there's a lot of excitement in the air, and big plans afoot. But afterwards, let's not forget that most of what we need to do is pretty basic stuff. Right now, people are still stoking the controversy supposedly raised by emails hacked from scientists at the Climatic Research Institute, but when it's eccentric creationist Sarah Palin calling for a Copenhagen boycott on "scientific" grounds, it looks like the skeptics have hit the bottom of the barrel. The IT world is excited about IDC's calculation that there is plenty that information technology can do to reduce the world's dependence on fossil fuels, and its production of greenhouse gases. In the runup to Copenhagen, the analyst said around 5.8 billion tonnes of CO2 (20 percent of the total in 2004) can be cut using ICT instead of ...
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    9. Do SuperComputers Turn a Green Data Center Gray? By Doug Maloney

      Do SuperComputers Turn a Green Data Center Gray?  By Doug Maloney
      Green data center technology and supercomputing aren't two things that go well together, and there's a reason why. Faster computational performance in a densely packed space requires the hottest – literally – CPUs available packed very close together. All that heat requires somewhere to go, which requires cooling and more dollars to the power bill. Exhibit A for this is IBM's Blue Waters supercomputer being built at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus, as reported by News.com. The machine is getting its own 88,000 square foot building and be theoretically capable of speeds of 10 petaflops, about 10 times as fast as the fastest supercomputer today. Blue Waters will use lots and lots of brand new IBM Power7 processors expected out in the first half of 2010 – a total of 16,384 chips together. Each Power7 processor integrates eight processing cores in one chip package and each ...
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    10. Wonderful, Wonderful Copenhagen- by Paul Bernier

      Wonderful, Wonderful Copenhagen- by Paul Bernier
      President Obama heads to Copenhagen for the United Nations Climate Change Conference. While there, he’s expected to commit to lowering U.S. greenhouse gas emissions 17 percent by 2020. For all the talk about the environment, the United State currently lacks national regulations around greenhouse gases, although 29 states have adopted or are considering such legislation, and the House in June passed a bill addressing this issue, according to the ICT Green Report recently issued by the Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA). This goal that the President is expected to put on the table in Denmark can also be found in the Waxman-Markey bill that made its way through the U.S. House of Representatives back in June. The Senate is now doing work of its own on this front. That said, Obama is clearly expecting this legislation to become reality so he can deliver on the promise.
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    11. "climate gate" won't halt the carbon economy- by Peter Judge

      "climate gate" won't halt the carbon economy- by Peter Judge
      IT people will have two questions over the leak of emails from a leading climate change research institute last week. What does it imply about email security, and does it really blow apart the consensus around global warming - and if so, can we stop worrying about building green data centers? The security question won't be answered for a while. The University of East Anglia's Climatic Research Institute (CRU) is a leading source of climate data, and a major contributor to the science behind the political move to prevent global warming. There's likely to be an inquiry into the way the emails were leaked, but the University is wary it could turn into a media circus.
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    12. IDC Index, Study to Offer G20 Environmental ICT Rankings, Recommendations- by Paula Bernier

      IDC Index, Study to Offer G20 Environmental ICT Rankings, Recommendations- by Paula Bernier
      A new index to be released the week after next by research and consulting firm IDC scores various G20 countries’ abilities to harness IT and communications technologies to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, and explains why each ranks as it does. The goal of the ICT Sustainability Index, according to IDC, is both to create new understanding around these issues in general as well as to help these countries prioritize and include such communications-related investments as part of their environmental strategies going forward.
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    13. Legislation Sparking Green Innovation in Iceland - By Tate Cantrell

      Legislation Sparking Green Innovation in Iceland - By Tate Cantrell
      Following my last blog on the expanding green movement comes some pretty big news surrounding carbon reduction legislation making its way through the US Congress. The U.S. climate bill just passed its first test in the Senate with an 11 to 1 vote by the Environment and Public Works Committee to move onto the full Senate for consideration with other bills. The proposed legislation would require U.S. industry to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases 20 percent by 2020, from 2005 levels. The progress is certainly opportune timing as the U.S. along with 190+ countries head to Copenhagen in December for the UN Climate Change Conference to try to build the framework for a global treaty on reducing carbon emissions.
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    14. Time to Dive into Liquid Cooling - by Peter Judge

      Time to Dive into Liquid Cooling - by Peter Judge
      Liquid cooling is bubbling back to the surface of green IT thinking. Last week saw the launch of a new system which claims to cut cooling costs for servers, by around 93 percent - and IBM has predicted that all servers could ultimately be cooled by liquid. Liquid cooling used to be the Roll Royce option. The only way to make super-dense, super-expensive supercomputers work without overheating, while more ordinary mainframes and computers could get along happily with air. Now, with virtualisation and miniaturisation, blade servers in data centres are becoming so densely packed that removing the heat is becoming the biggest barrier to making them more efficient. But surely, liquid cooling would be too costly? UK-based Icetope reckons it can fix that with a modular system it launched at Supercomputing 2009 last week.
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      Mentions: IBM Peter Judge
    15. NSA Going Green with $1.6 Billion Utah Data Center by Doug Mohney

      NSA Going Green with $1.6 Billion Utah Data Center by Doug Mohney
      Even the National Security Agency (NSA) is not immune to the lure of green IT. Information Week says the agency responsible for monitoring and protecting against cybersecurity threats will build a brand new $1.5 billion data center in Utah to provide intelligence and warnings related to cybersecurity threats, cybersecurity support to defense and civilian agency networks, and technical assistance to the Department of Homeland Security. Being built at Camp William, a National Guard training center 26 miles south of Salt Lake City, phase one of the NSA center will be a $800 million, 30 megawatt facility, with an $800 million expansion in phase two to 65 megawatts – or about the same amount of power used by all the homes in Salt Lake City combine.
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    16. Cloudy with a chance of flexibility by Paula Bernier

      Cloudy with a chance of flexibility by Paula Bernier
      Cloud-based services, which can offer benefits in terms of energy efficiency and lowering energy consumption, are poised to make some exciting advances in terms of standardization, management and what I’ll refer to as mobility. For example, Fujitsu says its IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service) platform will enable customers to create, configure, expand, and delete their information and communication technology via the Internet via either a Web browser or by software through a cloud API. Perhaps more important, however, is that by standardizing the cloud API, which Fujitsu aims to do through its work with the Distributed Management Task Force, could greatly reduce customer dependency on one particular cloud provider. That means customers could potentially switch cloud providers without having to change their applications.
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    17. Dummies for Green IT --By Doug Mohney

      Dummies for Green IT --By Doug Mohney
      Yes Virginia, there is a "Dummies" book for Green IT Green IT for Dummies doesn't break any rules out of "For Dummies" tried and tested formula, other than a couple of splashes of green on the on the front of back of the loud yellow color. On the other hand, it does provide a lot of clue if you are starting from ground zero in building a plan to going green in your data center. Resist the urge to skip the first chapter – "Win-Win-Winning with Green IT" – it may be a bit too rah-ray for some, but there are a number of interesting pointers to more information and factoids that will provide useful. For example, some college grads will accept $13,000 less in lower starting salary to work for/on Green IT initiatives; you have to love being able to save the planet while saving money on a ...
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    18. The Sun Devil is in the details by Paula Bernier

      The Sun Devil is in the details by Paula Bernier
      The Greenbuild International Conference and Expo is wrapping up its last day today in Phoenix, Ariz., not far from my home office in Scottsdale. The event featured such environmental lights as former Vice President Al Gore and singer/activist Sheryl Crow as well as speakers from the Discovery Channel, the Green Building Council, the National Geographic Society and leading companies including John Deere and Starbucks. The event covered everything from climate change, public transportation, sustainable food strategies, LEED certification and regulatory/political aspects of the green revolution to best environmental practices around water purification, building ventilation and lighting, demolition and more.
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    19. The People, Process And Technology Of Next Generation Data Centers - By Tate Cantrell

      The People, Process And Technology Of Next Generation Data Centers - By Tate Cantrell
      We are closing in on Interop New York and I am looking forward to contributing to a panel discussion, entitled The People, Process And Technology Of Next Generation Data Centers. This is an exceptionally relevant topic as we see IT and facilities managers alike embracing the financial and ecological efficiencies of process convergence. At Verne Global, we offer wholesale data center solutions and as such, we are focused on ensuring that the enterprise can maximize the benefits of process convergence while reaping the financial rewards that outsourcing can provide. And truly – financial benefit is surely the ultimate goal of the new generations of technologies.
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      Mentions: Tate Cantrell
    20. Easier to be Green outside of North American and Europe by Doug Mohney

      Easier to be Green outside of North American and Europe by Doug Mohney
      With a trio of announcements, IBM finds an embrace of Green IT data center practices outside of North America and Europe. EWeek.com reports the company is going to build energy-efficient data centers in Brazil, Slovakia, and India. The reasons behind the deals shouldn't be surprising. IBM says about half (yes, half) of its green data center revenue is coming in from outside of the United States. Companies in emerging markets find that power is expensive and/or there's limited access to it. In addition, there's (to abuse the term) a green field effect in building from scratch, so it is easier for companies to incorporate new technologies from the start in South America, Eastern Europe, and parts of Asia and the Middle East. Companies are not burdened with a lot of legacy equipment and thinking, so they can move directly to incorporating the best green practices ...
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    21. Seeing Green by Paula Bernier

      Seeing Green by Paula Bernier
      Hello. This is my first blog on this site, so I’d like to start with a quick introduction. As you can see, my name is Paula Bernier and I’m an 18-year reporting veteran of the communications space. I’m exciting to have been invited to blog for Green Data Center News given all the interest and important developments related to improving energy efficiency and lessening environmental impacts at the data center as well as the broader pushes on these fronts across the network, the nation and many parts of the world.
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    22. Green Shoots are Thriving in Iceland by Tate Cantrell

      Green Shoots are Thriving in Iceland by Tate Cantrell
      Many of my recent blogs have explored the benefits that Iceland offers as a data center location for low-cost electricity and cooling in the growing green movement. As the movement strengthens and carbon-reducing legislation continues materializing around globe, Iceland could be the one who in turn sees a benefit from environmentally conscious IT industry projects. Technology innovation and clean energy are now making a major impact on how and where companies conduct their business. No longer thought of as a fad, this affection for eco-friendliness is catching the attention of numerous businesses and investors worldwide in an otherwise dreary economical landscape.
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    23. As Simple as curtains? By Doug Mohney

      As Simple as curtains?  By Doug Mohney
      Could saving energy in a data center be as simple as installing curtains? It sounds too good to be true, but Simplex Isolation Systems says its AirBlock curtains and partitions can save as much as 15 percent on air conditioning power and up to 67 percent on fans. Most interestingly, it's a very low-tech solution; you can find the same type of technology in your grocer's large walk-in freezer. Think about the vertical plastic "strips" you've seen across the front of a freezer. Those simple overlapping strips serve to keep cold air in freezers while allowing people to move freely in and out of the space without having to fuss with opening and closing the door all the time. The same technology is being used to partition up data center aisles into hot and cold areas for more efficient cooling.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    24. Uncle Sam wants green data centers - by Doug Mohney

      Uncle Sam wants green data centers - by Doug Mohney
      Federal data centers are being targeted for energy reductions as a part of a broader push for U.S. government agencies to reduce greenhouse gases, reports Federaltimes.com. But will it make a difference? An executive order signed by President Barak Obama on October 5 requires agencies to begin measuring greenhouse gas emissions and set targets for reducing them. Data centers look to be an easy target for savings since the government owns around 10 percent of the country's centers and servers based upon an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimated generated on 2006 data. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is now in the process of collecting updated statistics from all agencies, including details on energy consumption, property location and capacity of centers; the last inventory by OMB was back in 1999 – a couple of lifetimes of server hardware and data growth.
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