1. Green Data Center News

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    1. Green IT not a buying priority, Gartner said by Carol Wilson

      Green IT not a buying priority, Gartner said by Carol Wilson
      A new Gartner Group study shows that environmental concerns are not driving IT purchasing, despite the fact those concerns are a top priority. In the latest Gartner study, two-thirds of respondents see energy management as the most important environmental challenge facing them over the next 18 months, but only seven percent see green procurement as a top priority. The reason, Rakesh Kumar, research vice-president at the firm, said in a press release, is that IT managers are more focused on internal projects such as consolidating and rationalizing data center resources and virtualizing servers, than on buying more energy-efficient servers or energy management tools. next 18 month
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    2. ServInt's Green Journey – Part 2 by Doug Mohney

      ServInt's Green Journey – Part 2 by Doug Mohney
      As ServInt has moved into the green data center world over the past five years, CTO Christian Dawson has been confronted with defining what exactly "green" means to the company and to his customers. It has been a long road to develop a comprehensive, verifiable strategy to make its operations greener without resorting to "disingenuous marketing hype," Dawson said. And green, while good, isn't main decision point in buyer considerations. "Customers care about being up," Dawson stated. "That's the bottom line. However, they absolutely care about the companies they do business with being forward looking. " ServInt's customers value the fact that the web hosting company is thinking long-term, as well as providing a service that is reliable, valuable, and competitive. "Our green initiative is an extension of our general philosophy that you should be able to find a host for life," said Dawson. "Our customers like that ...
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    3. There is a solution to pollution by tate cantrell

      There is a solution to pollution by tate cantrell
      I recently read the article, “Weather Centre a Massive Polluter”, by Ben Jackson in Britain’s The Sun newspaper.  The article has created a storm of controversy in the media, but I think it presents an opportunity for companies to look at new solutions for cutting their energy consumption. The report pointed fingers at some of the UK’s worst polluters – specifically the UK Meteorological Office. The Met Office’s headquarters building in Devon came in 103rd place on a list of close to 30,000 public buildings that leave the largest carbon footprints in the UK. This is primarily due to its use of a powerful IBM supercomputer used to predict climate change. The Met Office spokesman told the paper that the computer was vital to help forecast weather and environmental change and its predictions helped to reduce global carbon emissions.
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    4. Can Kundra tame the fed's it beast? by Carol Wilson

      Can Kundra tame the fed's it beast?  by Carol Wilson
      Last week, U.S. CIO Vivek Kundra gave cloud computing a considerable boost – as if it was needed – by saying the federal government will now shift from building large, power-hungry data centers to using cloud computing to support the many IT initiatives needed to address societal problems, including education, health care and energy. But Kundra also challenged the industry to provide solutions to security, so that the federal government doesn’t have to be concerned that sensitive information is vulnerable in a cloud computing scenario. And he said the government is very interested in not just emulating what private industry has done with virtual data centers and software-as-a-service, but also using private commercial systems whenever it makes sense to do so, rather than building separate government-owned operations.
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    5. data centers - more harmful to the environment than airlines by tate cantrell

      data centers - more harmful to the environment than airlines by tate cantrell
       It’s no secret that the airline industry has come under fire more than a few times in the last few years due to its notoriously negative impact on air pollution.  A simple Google search can reveal plenty of stats out there to support how much pollution airplanes put into the Earth’s atmosphere. There is a great video currently being featured on Green Data Center News that actually maps out the world's air traffic over a 24 hour period and shows just how astonishingly busy our skies are on a given day and the vast amount of gasoline it must take to fuel our friendly skies.
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    6. standards, what standards for green it? by Doug Moheny

      standards, what standards for green it? by Doug Moheny
      Everyone is hot to build new green data centers, retrofit old data centers to be green, and sell the latest in green data center technology, but that doesn't really build a discussion that there are no hard and fast standards for what constitutes a green data center. It is an issue which data center operators will freely admit – and one which will likely end up causing considerable marketing debate in the future. The U.S. Green Building Council has plenty of information on LEED, the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Green Building Rating System. However, LEED is tuned for building design, as noted by the New York Times, not energy efficiency. The U.S. Green Building Council is only now going back and collecting energy use information from all the buildings it certifies, including power and water bills.
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    7. Jobs versus environment - what wins? By Carol Wilson

      Jobs versus environment - what wins?  By Carol Wilson
      Given the considerable presence of the U.S. auto industry in Michigan, that state has been particularly hard hit by the current economic downturn. So when state government goes on an IT efficiency kick and decides to systemically reduce its costs by consolidating operations and eliminating When the state goes one step further and plans to build a massive 100,000 square foot data center to host not only all state government applications but also those of local governments who are struggling, should we clap louder? duplicati
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      Mentions: Carol Wilson
    8. One stopping shopping for telecommunications and energy by Doug Mohney

      One stopping shopping for telecommunications and energy by Doug Mohney
      The chain leading from the phone closet to the utility bill may not seem obvious at first, but PAETEC CEO Arunas Chesonis says energy is the future of telecom. Since the entire IT and communications infrastructure has significant power requirements, there’s a ready relationship between the two. Chesonis, CEO of a national communication services company, predicted a decade ago that CIOs would be making all telecommunications decisions - a prophesy that has come true.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney Paetec
    9. Large Corporates Fall Short of Green Goals by Carol Wilson

      Large Corporates Fall Short of Green Goals by Carol Wilson
      With all the attention being given to reducing greenhouse gases, a major new report says we’re not doing nearly enough. “The Carbon Chasm” was produced by the Carbon Disclosure Project and supported by BT, and shows that the world’s largest companies need to do much more than they are currently planning in terms of reducing carbon emissions if we are to reach scientifically-recommended level of greenhouse gas cuts by 2050.
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      Mentions: Carol Wilson
    10. chasing cheap kilowatts has its limits by doug mohney

      chasing cheap kilowatts has its limits by doug mohney
      Least-cost energy routing (LCER) could save big online businesses "millions" of dollars each year in power, says a study written by researchers at MIT, Carnegie Mellon University, and Akamai.  Digging deeper, there are interesting subtleties within the actual scheme – and one hard limit. Energy pricing, to no great surprise, fluctuates for a variety of reasons, including seasonal changes in supply, fuel prices and changes in consumer demand. There is a lot of volatility baked in, even with geographically close locations, and researchers say there's no "nirvana" of cheap power at any given time.
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    11. Energy-aware Internet could mean data center revolution By Carol Wilson

      Energy-aware Internet could mean data center revolution By Carol Wilson
      A new study from some of the big guns of technology -- MIT, Carnegie Mellon University and content delivery network Akamai – is saying that major Internet players could save up to 40% of their electricity costs by using routing that automatically sends traffic to lower-cost data centers. The study, published in the MIT Technology Review, shows how an algorithm that makes Internet routing energy-aware could save millions of dollars. The idea originated with MIT PhD student Asfandyar Qureshi, and led to work with Akamai and the distributed servers that are part of its CDN, supporting many large Web sites by connecting large data centers.
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    12. Green IT monitoring on the cheap by doug mohney

      Green IT monitoring on the cheap by doug mohney
      If you are going to go green, you need to start with the basics – how much power are you using, and what is sucking down the most power in your data center. Reviewing the monthly utility bills is a good rough start, but you'll quickly find that you want more granular details to find the biggest power hogs down to the rack and device level. Packet Power (www.packetpower.com), a small startup out of Minneapolis, has quietly rolled out a cheap and easy way to monitor power consumption and temperature through the use of "smart" power cables.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    13. Data Centers in the downturn by carol wilson

      Data Centers in the downturn by carol wilson
      While everyone expects data center traffic to continue to grow exponentially for the foreseeable future, the reality of the current economy is that some companies are cutting back on their IT and telecom spends, to match the decline in their own revenues. How will that affect hosted data center services? Two new studies from Forrester Research, released this week, show interesting trends in how businesses are cutting back. The two reports, “The State Of Enterprise Networks And Telecommunications: 2009” and “The State Of SMB Networks And Telecommunications: 2009” were based on interviews with enterprise and SMB IT executives in North America and Europe.
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    14. A slow green reality by doug mohney

      A slow green reality by doug mohney
      Turning your data center green is a great concept, but it's not going to happen overnight for a number of reasons. Unless you are building a new data center from scratch – and most likely being subsidized by a vendor as a demonstration project – implementing energy-efficiency and carbon reduction planning has to be a little like planning for retirement. You have to have a goal, you have to have a plan, you have to contribute to (work on) the plan on a steady, regular basis, and you have to have a date to pull the trigger.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    15. Cooling your data center is a breeze by tate cantrell

      Cooling your data center is a breeze by tate cantrell
      With today’s economy still trying to recover and new standards being set for green IT, it’s hard to justify spending millions of dollars and guzzling megawatts of electricity chilling data centers when you can cool it for free. According to predictions by The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, power costs for data centers could rise to as high as $7.4 billion a year by 2012 without efficiency improvements. Data center owners and large companies are working to reduce their carbon footprint by removing internal air-conditioning and bringing in naturally cool outside air.
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    16. Looking beyond the Kyoto Treaty by carol wilson

      Looking beyond the Kyoto Treaty by carol wilson
      Many within the environmental movement hoped Barack Obama’s election to the White House would mean U.S. ratification of the Kyoto Accord, the U.N. climate treaty that seeks to limit the carbon emissions thought to cause global warming. What President Obama has done instead is establish the U.S. as a leader in negotiating the next version of Kyoto, which expires in 2012.
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    17. Green Ethernet promises to save power, eventually by doug mohney

      Green Ethernet promises to save power, eventually by doug mohney
      Jumping on the green bandwagon, the IEEE has issued the world’s first Ethernet standard strictly directed at power reduction. “Green” Ethernet is a great idea, but it is going to take years before it shows up in products and may have little usefulness in an optimized data center. More specifically, the IEEE 802.3az Energy-efficiency Ethernet standard has been forwarded to ballot with the goal of getting approval in September 2010 – so about a year before it is an official standard by anyone’s definition.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    18. Environmental Responsibility in the US and Beyond by tate cantrell

      Environmental Responsibility in the US and Beyond by tate cantrell
      Following up on one of my recent blogs about the UK government’s push for carbon reduction, I thought I would discuss some recent developments that have taken place with the United States’ new cap-and-trade plan to address the issue of carbon emissions. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (ACES) introduces a variant of a "cap-and-trade" system with market-based incentives to reduce carbon pollution through the use of energy efficiency and clean energy technologies. Companies that do not reduce their carbon emissions will pay more for pollution allowances. The bill was recently approved by the House...
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    19. Getting the right cloud by carol wilson

      Getting the right cloud by carol wilson
      As much as we all rail against hype in the world of technology, the truth is hype plays a significant role – it draws attention to innovations and enables those that ultimately succeed to get the focus, funding and market power they need. Gartner realized this years ago in defining the hype cycle. But the down side of hype is that it often renders once-meaningful terms into clichéd marketing gimmicks, which is what cloud computing seems headed for.
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      Mentions: Carol Wilson
    20. What's on your roof? by doug mohney

      What's on your roof? by doug mohney
      The space on top of your building is likely to become a lot more interesting over the next couple of years. Depending on geographic location, the roof on a data center can be a valuable piece of real estate for generating revenue. Can green (money) and green (improving the environment) live in harmony? Many data centers that are tenants of large building are already familiar with the concept of "roof rights" – the ability to place devices on open roof space in exchange for some fee per month. Cellular antennas and satellite dishes are typically the most popular pieces of hardware one might find on the roof, followed by different flavors of antennas for high-speed point-to-point wireless technology.
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      Mentions: Doug Mohney
    21. Falling for hydro all over again by carol wilson

      Falling for hydro all over again by carol wilson
      You can’t deny there’s a romantic ring to the idea that Niagara Falls will power Yahoo!’s next data center, being built in Lockport, N.Y. And while this is a recent development, hydroelectric power was the first renewable source of energy sought by those building data centers. The reasons are obvious – there’s nothing uncertain about hydroelectric power – its costs and benefits are well established, as is the technology that enables man to convert moving water into electricity. Before there was a major environmental push, major data center builders such as Google sought out river-side location for their largest operations, such as Google’s Oregon data center complex on the banks of the Columbia River.
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    22. Benefits of Embracing Environmental Responsibility by Tate Cantrell

      Benefits of Embracing Environmental Responsibility by Tate Cantrell
      The UK has been at the forefront of the push for reducing carbon emissions since becoming the first country to put their efforts into law at the end of 2007 with the Climate Change Bill. Introduced under this plan is the rapidly approaching and mandatory Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC), slated to come into effect in April of 2010. The government estimates that the scheme will affect 25% of total business sector emissions within the UK with an ultimate goal of reducing greenhouse emissions by 60% by 2050.
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    23. Finding the balance by Carol Wilson

      Finding the balance by Carol Wilson
      One word that you hear repeatedly in any discussion of finding new energy sources is balance. Literally speaking, balance is a state of equilibrium, but in the context of the environment, it often means juggling multiple interests, priorities and forces to find a reasonable compromise. In most parts of the world, keeping things in balance where the environment is concerned means doing what can reasonably and affordably be done to conserve energy or shift energy usage to renewable sources. In Iceland, where geothermal energy, potentially an endlessly renewable source of energy, is abundant and cheap, there is another balancing act taking place.
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