1. Articles in category: Fossil Fuel

    265-288 of 533 « 1 2 ... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 ... 21 22 23 »
    1. Could Solar Power Be More Than Window Dressing?

      Could Solar Power Be More Than Window Dressing?
      Solar power has been only capable of producing a small part of data centre energy needs, but this may change, says Peter Judge Solar power has always seemed a good long term bet for renewable energy. After all, pretty much every single Joule of energy we use on the planet comes from the sun originally The sun’s energy is caught by plants, which make fuels, either through the long process of fossilisation producing oil and gas, or by directly producing wood, or man-made ethanol to burn. Animals’ energy comes from plants, and the sun drives the water cycle which produces hydro-electric energy. Nuclear power uses energy stored from older suns where the heavier elements are made. Geothermal energy does include energy originating on earth – it is the heat of the earth’s core, but it is maintained at that temperature by radioactive decay inside the earth.
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      Mentions: Peter Judge
    2. Apple Risks Greenpeace Ire With Oregon Data Centre

      Apple Risks Greenpeace Ire With Oregon Data Centre
      Apple is considering a data centre in Prineville Oregon, near to Facebook, a move sure to anger Greenpeace Apple is reportedly considering following in the footsteps of Facebook by building a mammoth data centre in Prineville, Oregon. However if the reports are true, the move will surely incur the wrath of environmental campaigners Greenpeace. According to OregonLive.com, which cited two people with direct knowledge of Apple’s plans, Apple is close to making a decision about whether to build a large data centre in Prineville, which will be located a quarter mile south of the Facebook server farm that opened in 2011.
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    3. Global industry CO2 output rises even in weak economy

      Global industry CO2 output rises even in weak economy
      Global carbon dioxide emissions from industry rose about 3 percent in a weak global economy this year, a study released today showed, adding fresh urgency to efforts to control planet-warming gases at U.N. climate talks in South Africa. The study by the Global Carbon Project, an annual report card on mankind's CO2 pollution, says a slowdown in emissions during the 2008-09 global financial crisis was a mere speed bump, and the gain in 2011 followed a 6 percent surge in 2010. "The global financial crisis was an opportunity to move the global economy away from a high-emissions trajectory. Our results provide no indication of this happening," the authors say in the study published in the journal Nature Climate Change.
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      Mentions: U.N. United Nations
    4. U.S. Tech Giants Become Alternative Energy's Fairy Godfathers

      U.S. Tech Giants Become Alternative Energy's Fairy Godfathers
      While the failure of government-backed solar start-up Solyndra generated a lot of news headlines, it has also encouraged some discussion about the role of government in helping get new industries off the ground. It may also have highlighted the fact that venture capital companies and their investors may be starting to fall out of love with alternative energy, an industry that has proven it needs a long runway for take-off. Venture capitalists and investors, not always the most patient of people, seem to be increasingly wary about investing in technologies that are still in their infancy, or at least in their youth. But as the news last week brought us the knowledge that the seven billionth human being entered the world somewhere in India, the need to move forward with alternative energy remains urgent. And move forward it will: though it may not find itself using government cash or traditional ...
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    5. IBM brings solar power to data centers

      IBM brings solar power to data centers
      The company tomorrow will detail a pilot project that couples solar power with water-cooled servers that run on high-voltage direct current. The method results in about a 10 percent energy savings by reducing the losses that normally happen in converting from alternating power from the grid to the direct current servers run on, according to Kota Murali, the chief scientist of nanotechnology at IBM India who developed the pilot as a side project. That level of energy reduction is significant for large data centers with many servers, but the implications of solar and servers are potentially profound for places that don't have access to reliable power, Murali said. A bank, for example, that wanted to set up a remote branch and operate a data center could use solar power as a way to supplement power from the grid and on-site generators. IBM plans to offer the system in custom ...
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      Mentions: IBM
    6. Facebook to world: Clone your own data centers

      Facebook to world: Clone your own data centers
      Facebook today created a foundation to lead Open Compute, borrowing the open source software model to advance a set of freely available data center designs in order to speed hardware innovation and reduce the environmental impact of cloud computing. The company announced initial members and directors of the foundation at the second Open Compute Summit today in New York. It also intends to release details on its guiding principles and how projects will be proposed and handled. Facebook launched the Open Compute Project in April under the idea that the designs and specifications of its data centers can be shared to speed up innovation and improve the energy efficiency of data centers at Facebook and the industry at large.
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      Mentions: Facebook
    7. Facebook's New Datacentre: a renewable-powered friend?

      Facebook's New Datacentre: a renewable-powered friend?
      Greenpeace International (blog)Facebook's New Datacentre: a renewable-powered friend?Greenpeace International (blog)By locating the datacentre in Luleå, it can use free cooling from the frigid local climate and be close to renewable hydropower in the region. If you 'like' Facebook's news, let them know at our Facebook: Unfriend Coal page. And invite your friends to ...and more »
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    8. Can an IT Snowball Grow in Iceland?

      Iceland is working to tip the scales toward renewable energy in a world where most computing needs are powered by coal. More News From ClimateWire DOE Project Probes for a Major CO2 Repository for Northeast Power Plants Republicans Probe Whether DOE's Effort to Save Solyndra Violated 2005 Energy Act Nations Heading to Durban Climate Talks Remain Deeply Divided British Engineer Says Climate, Resource Problems Make Future Economic Growth Much Harder One Man's Struggle to Bridge the Landlord-Tenant Energy Divide A blog about energy and the environment. Go to Blog » The familiar fuss is that fossil fuels make the most business sense for computing. Data centers -- the big warehouses full of servers that process all our Googling, emailing, online banking and so forth -- are situated in areas that have easy access to cheap energy. Coal and other traditional energy sources keep them running. But as data centers proliferate to ...
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    9. Can Iceland's Renewables Power the Web?

      Can Iceland's Renewables Power the Web?
      Iceland is working to tip the scales toward renewable energy in a world where most computing needs are powered by coal. The familiar fuss is that fossil fuels make the most business sense for computing. Data centers -- the big warehouses full of servers that process all our Googling, emailing, online banking and so forth -- are situated in areas that have easy access to cheap energy. [More]
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    10. Green with Envy: Creating a Green Data Center

      Green with Envy: Creating a Green Data Center
      The world’s most advanced and sought after data centers not only have to guarantee optimal space, security, power and connectivity but also ensure far superior environmental performance than their predecessors. In the face of an increasingly arduous regulatory landscape, a worldwide financial crisis prompting companies to do more with less, and operators under pressure to deliver optimized energy environments to satisfy demanding environmental expectations from customers, what steps can next-generation data centers take to ensure they benefit from a green infrastructure? The following article offers practical considerations and tips for meeting the standards of today’s sustainable data center.
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    11. Waste Heat From Disney Data Centre Warms District

      Waste Heat From Disney Data Centre Warms District
      Disney has provided a peak “behind the magic”, at least in how its data centres will turn heat into energy Disneyland Paris is partnering with French energy provider Dalkia to showcase a green way to turn waste heat from its data centres into heating and hot water at a business park. Dalkia revealed that it will soon open its first district heating network in the Val d’Europe business park in Marne-la-Vallée near Paris. A BBC video of the building of the greenfield business park, which is mostly reportedly owned by Eurodisney, the operator of Disneyland Paris, can be found here. This district-wide heating network will be fuelled by energy recovered from a 8,000 square metre data centre on the site.
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    12. Carbon-neutral data center powered by renewable energy, cooled by Iceland's chilly climate

      Carbon-neutral data center powered by renewable energy, cooled by Iceland's chilly climate
      Building a data center that minimizes use of fossil fuels is one of the gargantuan tasks facing the IT industry, yet at least one company has a simple solution: move to Iceland. With cooling freely provided by nature and access to both geothermal and hydroelectric energy, the UK-based co-location vendor Verne Global says it is on the verge of opening a “100% carbon neutral” data center before ...
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    13. What it Will Take to Make Renewable Energy a Reality in the US

      What it Will Take to Make Renewable Energy a Reality in the US
      The IndypendentWhat it Will Take to Make Renewable Energy a Reality in the USThe IndypendentStill, its main initiative on global warming has been an unsuccessful attempt to enact a “cap and trade” system–essentially, “in exchange for being allowed to operate a coal-fired power plant in Tennessee, we'll buy a forest in Brazil and not cut it ...and more »
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    14. Energy Demand Is Expected to Rise 53% by 2035

      Energy Demand Is Expected to Rise 53% by 2035
      Global energy demand will increase 53 percent from 2008 through 2035, with China and India accounting for half of the growth, the United States Department of Energy said on Monday. A blog about energy and the environment. Go to Blog » Add to Portfolio NDB Energy Inc Go to your Portfolio » China and India will consume 31 percent of the world’s energy by 2035, up from 21 percent in 2008, the department’s International Energy Outlook projected. In 2035, Chinese energy demand will exceed that of the United States by 68 percent, it said. “Economic growth continues to look good in emerging nations,” Howard K. Gruenspecht, acting administrator of the Energy Information Administration, said on Monday at a briefing in Washington.
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    15. Google reveals electricity use, aims for a third clean power by 2012

      Google reveals electricity use, aims for a third clean power by 2012
      In a new green-focused website, Google has just revealed its total electricity use publicly for the first time and says it plans to have about a third of the electricity it consumes be sourced directly from clean power by 2012. Google hadn’t been willing to disclose its electricity consumption before, citing competitive reasons, and if you remember earlier this year Greenpeace gave Google an “F’ for transparency. Google’s new transparency about its electricity consumption and carbon footprint is part of a new trend of data center operators sharing energy efficiency tools and methodologies. Facebook launched its Open Compute program earlier this year, revealing its energy-efficient server and data center designs. Google has also been willing to share its green data center best practices and has held annual summits on green data centers, but the electricity number took longer in coming. But as Rick Needham, Google’s green business ...
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    16. ClearEdge Power to make fuel cell for data centers

      ClearEdge Power to make fuel cell for data centers
      ClearEdge Power is making what it hopes is the Goldilocks of fuel cells, a power source big enough for a business or school but less expensive than larger, high-end models. The Hillsboro, Ore.-based company today said it has raised $73.5 million from institutional investors as well as Austrian energy supplier Gussing Renewable Energy and utility Southern California Edison. ClearEdge Power's fuel cell delivers 5 kilowatts of electric power and the equivalent of 5.8 kilowatts of heat. (Credit: ClearEdge Power) The series E round will be used to expand to the east coast U.S. and internationally, including into central Europe. The company also intends to expand its product line with a fuel cell designed specifically for data centers, a product which is being now tested with customers, according to CEO Russell Ford. The data center fuel cell will provide power at about half the cost of ...
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    17. Quake in Japan Is Causing a Costly Shift to Fossil Fuels

      Quake in Japan Is Causing a Costly Shift to Fossil Fuels
      The half-century-old, oil-fueled power generators here had been idle for more than a year when, a day after the nuclear accident in March, orders came from Tokyo Electric Power headquarters to fire them up. “They asked me how long it would take,” said Masatake Koseki, head of the Yokosuka plant, which is 40 miles south of Tokyo and run by Tokyo Electric. “The facilities are old, so I told them six months. But they said, ‘No, you must ready them by summer to prepare for an energy shortage.’ ” Now, at summer’s peak, Yokosuka’s two fuel-oil and two gas turbines are cranking out a total of 900,000 kilowatts of electricity a day — and an abundance of fumes. The generators are helping to replace the 400 million kilowatt-hours of daily electricity production lost this summer because of the shutdown of all but 15 of Japan’s 54 nuclear reactors ...
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    18. Bloom Energy to power data center with biogas

      Bloom Energy to power data center with biogas
      NTT America soon will be able to claim a data center that runs on biogas. The Japanese telecommunications company today said it will install five Bloom Energy fuel cells in its California data center that will use biogas as a fuel. It's a sign of the growing interest in cleaner fuel cell technology, which proponents say will increasingly be adapted for residential customers. The fuel cells will be able to generate 500 kilowatts of power, which is enough for about 500 U.S. homes. At the data center, they will generate 4.2 million kilowatt-hours per year and reduce NTT America's carbon dioxide emissions by 1.6 million pounds. Utilities in California offer the option of purchasing biogas, a mixture of methane and carbon dioxide captured from dairy farms. The Bloom Energy "servers" are designed to run on natural gas, which is mostly methane, but will also convert ...
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      Mentions: NTT At&T Bloom Energy
    19. The Fall and Rise of the Carbon Coalition

      The Fall and Rise of the Carbon Coalition
      Since the Kyoto Protocol was developed in 1997, an unlikely new global partnership of bankers and environmentalists has emerged. I call it the Carbon Coalition, and while it seems like a very 21st century development, I actually trace its emergence back to the arrival of Reaganism in the 1980s. Under Ronald Reagan, Americans began to see the market itself as a potential tool of government, something politicans could work with, rather than simply against (on the left) or for (on the right). With this shift, Reagan made it possible for Democrats, and their traditional constituencies, to change: It's safe to say that it was Reagan who begat Bill Clinton, who then begat Tony Blair. For better or worse, the political right, through success, made the left become more attendant to the values of market capitalism. This affected everyone in the Democrats' tent, including environmentalists.
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    20. The Trigeneration Data Center: What Is It?

      The Trigeneration Data Center: What Is It?
      Last week, the Data Center Journal (“Should I Be Generating My Own Power for My Data Center?”) discussed the possibility of data centers generating their own power—a strategy that involves greater capital costs but that can also yield tremendous benefits in terms of power quality and freedom from the vagaries of the power grid. For data centers that elect to generate some or all of their own power for operations, trigeneration offers a way to stretch fuel costs even further. Needless to say, implementing trigeneration infrastructure involves initial capital costs, but with energy prices continually rising, a properly planned and implemented trigeneration scheme can quickly provide a return on this investment. Trigeneration: What Is It? When a fuel such as natural gas or coal is burned, the result is heat energy and waste materials (gases such as carbon dioxide, for instance).
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  1. Categories

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      Construction and Infrastructure, Container, Data Center Outages, Monitoring, Power and Cooling
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    3. Power:

      Biomass, Fossil Fuel, Fuel Cell, Geothermal, Hydro, Nuclear, Solar, Wind
    4. Application:

      Cloud Computing, Grid Computing
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      Microblogging, Networking, Servers, Storage, Supercomputer
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