1. Articles in category: Emissions

    73-96 of 1051 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 42 43 44 »
    1. ODCA publishes cloud carbon emission study

      ODCA publishes cloud carbon emission study

      The Open Data Center Alliance (ODCA) has outlined how organisations can use proof of concept (PoC) techniques to cut carbon emissions from the data centres that run their cloud services. The concepts have been put forward in its ODCA Carbon Footprint and Energy Efficiency Usage Model report, which is based on a study conducted with Alliance members including BMW, Datapipe and Verne Global.

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    2. Gigaom checks out Apple NC data center renewable energy infrastructure

      Gigaom checks out Apple NC data center renewable energy infrastructure

      Images by Katie Fehrenbacher, Gigaom Apple's huge Maiden, N.C., data center has recently become something else -- a net power provider of clean energy to Duke Energy. Gigaom's Katie Fehrenbacher took a look at Apple's new power-production facilities , which generate a total of 50 MW (megawatts) of electricity for a data center that uses about 40 MW of power. 

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      Mentions: Apple CA
    3. Gas powered fuel cells could cut data center costs 20% - Microsoft

      Gas powered fuel cells could cut data center costs 20% - Microsoft

      Fuel cell technology powered by natural gas could cut data center costs by as much as 20%, analysts at Microsoft have suggested. In a new paper titled, "No More Electrical Infrastructure: Towards Fuel Cell Powered Data Centers" researchers estimated that using localised power generation, instead of buying electricity from the grid, could significantly reduce the estimated 38GW of global energy used by data centers each year. 

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      Mentions: Microsoft Corp
    4. Microsoft Proposes Fuel Cells Inside Data Centre Racks

      Microsoft Proposes Fuel Cells Inside Data Centre Racks

      Microsoft will test a new data centre architecture which will reduce electrical infrastructure by building fuel cells into the equipment racks themselves, creating units that power themselves and eliminating the need for backup power. Fuel cells, which burn methane from natural gas or biogas cleanly, and produce electricity, have been suggested for data centre power, and eBay has built one entirely powered by the devices, but Microsoft’s proposal goes further, bringing the units indoors and reducing infrastructure in the process. 

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      Mentions: Microsoft Corp
    5. Microsoft sees huge potential in fuel cells

      Microsoft is touting the use of fuel cells to power data centers, arguing in a paper released Tuesday that its studies find it a technology with much potential. The paper, boldly titled "No more electrical infrastructure: Towards fuel cell powered data centers," investigates fuel cells as a centralized power source and as distributed power generation technology with fuel cells used at the rack or single server cabinet level. 

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    6. Push This Button to Serve Web Pages With Clean Electricity

      Push This Button to Serve Web Pages With Clean Electricity

      IBM has patented a way to cut the carbon emissions of cloud computing. By some estimates data centers now consume more than two percent of the United States’ electricity, and tech giants like Apple, Google and Microsoft have spent hundreds of millions of dollars greening up their operations by buying renewable energy as the economy increasingly moves into the cloud.

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    7. Microsoft Will Use Fuel Cells to Create Self-Powered Racks

      Microsoft Will Use Fuel Cells to Create Self-Powered Racks

      Microsoft says integrating fuel cells directly into data center racks can eliminate power distribution systems and even server-level power supplies, dramatically reducing energy loss. This approach builds on Microsoft's goal of creating “data plants ...

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    8. Microsoft Will Use Fuel Cells to Create Self-Powered Racks

      Microsoft Will Use Fuel Cells to Create Self-Powered Racks

      November 12, 2013 -- Microsoft wants to bring power generation inside the rack, and make data centers cheaper and greener in the process. The company says it will test racks with built-in fuel cells, a move that would eliminate the need for expensive power distribution systems seen in traditional data centers. Keep on reading: Microsoft Will Use Fuel Cells to Create Self-Powered Racks

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    9. Microsoft to buy Texas wind energy to power its San Antonio data center

      Microsoft to buy Texas wind energy to power its San Antonio data center

      Microsoft is buying clean energy to help power a data center for the first time. On Monday morning the tech giant announced that it has entered a deal to buy 110 MW of wind energy from a wind farm that will be located just outside of Forth Worth, Texas, and will be connected to the power grid that supplies power to Microsoft’s San Antonio datacenter.

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    73-96 of 1051 « 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ... 42 43 44 »
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