1. Articles in category: Carbon Tax

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    1. Editorial: Don’t believe the myth that corporations oppose green initiatives

      Editorial: Don’t believe the myth that corporations oppose green initiatives

      There is a persistent myth that U.S. corporations oppose green initiatives. To the contrary, many are embracing a green future and reduced carbon footprints as profitable strategic investments. According to the Rocky Mountain Institute, a clean-energy think tank, U.S. companies bought nearly three times as much solar and wind power under long-term contracts in 2015 as they did in 2014. How significant is that?

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    2. Worldwide Climate Policies Adding Up To Two Steps Forward, One Back

      Awareness of the local, regional, and national political landscape is necessary for any data center operator, but nobody can know what the future will bring with exact certainty. For example, if I told you five years ago that the price of oil at the end of 2015 would be around $40 a barrel -- not $140, but $40 -- you would have laughed at me. Recent policy changes in Alberta, Canada, New York State, and Great Britain are examples of how local climate policies are constantly shifting, sometimes for the worse.

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    3. Presidential Candidates: Who Believes in Climate Change?

      Presidential Candidates: Who Believes in Climate Change?

      The presidential election of 2016 will determine the United States’ role in confronting and managing the impacts of climate change for years to come. A new University of Texas poll found that 76 percent of Americans (an increase of 8 percent from one year ago) now believe climate change is occurring, including 59 percent of Republicans. Will the growing numbers of believers affect the election?

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    4. Going entirely virtual is breaking new ground for efficiency

      Going entirely virtual is breaking new ground for efficiency

      With the trend towards more environmentally conscious businesses, the increased efficiency delivered through virtualisation means IT services are automatically delivered in a greener way. That’s because a natural side-effect of improved efficiency is reduced consumption of raw materials and therefore, a concurrent reduction in emissions and other by-products.

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    5. Obama Followed Long, Winding Path to Clean Power Plan

      Obama Followed Long, Winding Path to Clean Power Plan

      The U.S. Army/Flickr Climate change was riding an updraft in 2008. More Americans than ever before—or since—saw it as a troubling issue. And President-elect Obama had just pledged in his campaign to do something about it. So did his Republican opponent. It went from a salesman’s pitch to a presidential commitment two weeks after the election. Obama vowed to rewrite the nation’s energy profile, eliminating all but 20 percent of existing emissions within 40 years.

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    6. White House insists tough new carbon restrictions are legal under Clean Air Act

      White House insists tough new carbon restrictions are legal under Clean Air Act

      The White House insisted on Sunday it was on strong legal footing as it unveiled details of ambitious carbon-reduction plans that are likely to be fiercely opposed by coal-burning Republican states. Gina McCarthy, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), told reporters the Obama administration’s goal of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from US power plants by 32% between 2005 and 2030 kept squarely “within the four corners” of the Clean Air Act.

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    7. Oil Giant Predicts Carbon Will Harm Economic Growth, Calls For Renewables

      Oil Giant Predicts Carbon Will Harm Economic Growth, Calls For Renewables

      Climate change will hinder global economic growth within the next 25 years, according to the Norwegian oil giant Statoil, unless societies achieve the 2-degree limit on warming that many climate scientists already consider unrealistic. The world can achieve the strongest economic growth, Statoil Chief Economist Erik Wærness reiterated this morning in Washington D.C., by embracing renewable energy and limiting carbon emissions.

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    8. Capturing the Full and Unrealized Value of Biofuels -- Market Mechanisms are Needed

      Capturing the Full and Unrealized Value of Biofuels -- Market Mechanisms are Needed

      During the past decade, production of biofuels has gained momentum largely due to policies and mandates aimed at addressing energy security and climate change. A number of concerns, however, remain the subject of an on-going debate. These include: (1) the effectiveness of first generation biofuels (such as corn ethanol) in addressing climate change, (2) the effect of delays in the announcement of annual biofuel mandates, and (3) whether biofuels continue to provide an attractive option for energy security.

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    9. White House sets 20% data center efficiency goal, but finds few takers

      White House sets 20% data center efficiency goal, but finds few takers

      Without a carbon tax or anything that penalizes fossil fuel consumption, the federal government has little ability to influence how much energy a data center uses. But it is trying. In a blog post late Tuesday, the White House announced that 19 data centers have agreed to join a voluntary program to become 20% more energy efficient by 2020.

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    10. The end of Australia's carbon tax

      The end of Australia's carbon tax

      Australia’s government has said it now wants to abolish its Carbon Tax – legislation that would have made its largest emitters pay for carbon emissions. The move could stop such costs being passed on to customers. We asked our colleagues on LinkedIn - how will it affect overall design trends in the data center industry across the nation?

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    11. Will Microsoft’s Wind Of Change Hit Amazon?

      Will Microsoft’s Wind Of Change Hit Amazon?

      Last week, Microsoft bought a wind farm – and the wind of change might just blow in Amazon’s direction next. Microsoft has signed for the entire output of the 175MW Pilot Hill project in Illinois for the next 20 years. Under the deal Microsoft signs a contract, and its energy partner, EDF will buy Pilot Hill. It follows another wind power deal in Texas.

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    12. Should The UK Climate Change Agreement Favour Colos?

      Should The UK Climate Change Agreement Favour Colos?

      This month the UK’s Climate Change Agreement (CCA) for data centres came into force. And it looks like good news – especially for shared colocation space providers. Government intervention in any industry is always going to be controversial. Everyone from farmers to steel smelters thinks that they are standing on their own two feet, while everyone else is milking the state for handouts and tax breaks. Any government intervention has to be carefully put together, to achieve the intended goals and not create perverse incentives or waste public money.

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      Mentions: Peter Judge
    13. Colos in the UK celebrate new climate change agreement

      Colos in the UK celebrate new climate change agreement

      UK colocation operators celebrated their first day of being recognized by the government as an ‘industry’ as a new Climate Change Agreement (CCA) designed specifically for data centers came into effect yesterday. Numerous industry players lobbied to be recognized as an ‘energy intense’ industry under the government scheme, which has been running for about 50 other sectors since 2001.

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      Mentions: CRC
    14. UK Data Centre Industry Enters New Era

      UK Data Centre Industry Enters New Era

      Today marks the launch of the first Climate Change Agreement (CCA) for UK data centres and is a significant milestone for the industry, according to CBRE, the global real estate advisor. The data centre CCA, which has been in planning for four years, is formal recognition by the UK government, via the Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC), that the sector is a mature industry and significant contributor to the economy which requires its own legislation, and legal framework, to sustain industry growth.

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      Mentions: CBRE CRC
    15. Iceland Utility Touts Cheap Clean Energy to Lure Data Centers

      Iceland Utility Touts Cheap Clean Energy to Lure Data Centers

      There’s a lot to like about Iceland as a data center location. For one, it offers an immense amount of renewable energy and lets a provider lock down a rate for several years. With tech giants building in other Nordic countries, such as Facebook in Sweden and Google in Finland, Iceland might finally be primed to attract data center business on a big scale.

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    16. Britain's Data Center Tax Break Might Offend PUE-rists by Peter Judge

      As I wrote last week, Britain now has a green tax exemption for shared (colocation) data centers. To qualify for a break that effectively cuts energy cost by ten percent, organisations have to promise to increase energy efficiency.

      Unlike other business sectors, data centers don’t have a measurable output, so industry group TechUK convinced the Department of Energy and Climate Change to determine efficiency by cutting wasted energy. They agree to measure efficiency using the industry standard: PUE (power usage effectiveness).

      Or did they?

      The details are still being worked out, but PUE-rists got a small surprise at the meeting where TechUK explained the deal, which is known as a Climate Change Agreement. As it turns out, the mechanics of the deal means it doesn’t exactly use PUE.

      To qualify for the tax break, an organisation has to use almost all its energy in the data center. That ...

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    17. British Data Centers Get a Green Tax Break

      This week, British data centers got an exemption from carbon taxes. If that sounds like a backwards step in the drive for more efficiency, you need to get the full picture. It’s about balancing business and the environment, and it’s likely to boost the public cloud and colocation industry in the UK.

      Data centers in Britain are liable to pay two carbon taxes. These are “sin taxes” (aka Pigovian taxes), designed to curb harmful activity by putting up the price - in this case the cost of greenhouse gas emissions.

      All British businesses pay the Climate Change Levy (CCL), which adds around 0.5p (8c) to the price of each kiloWatt hour (kWh) of electricity. Larger organisations, which use more than 6000 MegaWatt hour of electricity per year, also fall into the CRC energy efficiency scheme. That’s a more complicated thing, which effectively adds around 1p (16c) to ...

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      Mentions: The Green Grid CRC
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  1. Categories

    1. Data Center Design:

      Construction and Infrastructure, Container, Data Center Outages, Monitoring, Power and Cooling
    2. Policy:

      Cap and Trade, Carbon Footprint, Carbon Reduction Commitment, Carbon Tax, Emissions
    3. Power:

      Biomass, Fossil Fuel, Fuel Cell, Geothermal, Hydro, Nuclear, Solar, Wind
    4. Application:

      Cloud Computing, Grid Computing
    5. Technology:

      Microblogging, Networking, Servers, Storage, Supercomputer
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