1. Articles in category: Cap and Trade

    1-24 of 166 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 »
    1. Presidential Candidates: Who Believes in Climate Change?

      Presidential Candidates: Who Believes in Climate Change?

      The presidential election of 2016 will determine the United States’ role in confronting and managing the impacts of climate change for years to come. A new University of Texas poll found that 76 percent of Americans (an increase of 8 percent from one year ago) now believe climate change is occurring, including 59 percent of Republicans. Will the growing numbers of believers affect the election?

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    2. Obama Followed Long, Winding Path to Clean Power Plan

      Obama Followed Long, Winding Path to Clean Power Plan

      The U.S. Army/Flickr Climate change was riding an updraft in 2008. More Americans than ever before—or since—saw it as a troubling issue. And President-elect Obama had just pledged in his campaign to do something about it. So did his Republican opponent. It went from a salesman’s pitch to a presidential commitment two weeks after the election. Obama vowed to rewrite the nation’s energy profile, eliminating all but 20 percent of existing emissions within 40 years.

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    3. White House insists tough new carbon restrictions are legal under Clean Air Act

      White House insists tough new carbon restrictions are legal under Clean Air Act

      The White House insisted on Sunday it was on strong legal footing as it unveiled details of ambitious carbon-reduction plans that are likely to be fiercely opposed by coal-burning Republican states. Gina McCarthy, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), told reporters the Obama administration’s goal of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from US power plants by 32% between 2005 and 2030 kept squarely “within the four corners” of the Clean Air Act.

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    4. 2013 was a good year for climate science, but a mixed bag for climate policy

      2013 was a good year for climate science, but a mixed bag for climate policy

      However, on a local level, British Columbia's revenue-neutral carbon tax remains highly popular and successful, and California implemented a similarly popular carbon cap and trade system in 2013. And the national news isn't all bad, as the US ...

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    5. Obama forges ahead with green energy agenda despite congressional opposition

      Obama forges ahead with green energy agenda despite congressional opposition

      For the first time since the Carter Administration, solar panels are going up on the roof of the White House. It's part of a mandate towards renewable energy in the federal government, but also a symbolic gesture that the president is plowing ahead with his green energy agenda, regardless of congressional opposition.

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    6. The British Government Goes Stark Staring Mad Over Climate Change

      The British Government Goes Stark Staring Mad Over Climate Change

      Christopher Booker highlights a decision in Parliament which is at the very best somewhat absurd: Last Tuesday something happened in the House of Commons so weird that it must be counted as one of the more terrifying episodes in the entire history of our Parliament. Towards the end of a seven-hour debate on its virtually incomprehensible, 200-page Energy Bill, the Government slipped in a new ...

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    7. The Wall Street Journal Is Wrong Here: Low Carbon Permit Prices Are Just Great

      The Wall Street Journal Is Wrong Here: Low Carbon Permit Prices Are Just Great

      The Wall Street Journal tells us that the entire edifice of Europe's attempt at controlling carbon emissions has come tumbling down. They say this because the price of permits on the trading exchange has tumbled. But they seem to be unaware that low prices are just great, this is what we actually desire: One of the great policy bubbles of our times has been cap and trade for carbon emissions ...

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    8. Why can't we give up fossil fuels?

      Why can't we give up fossil fuels?

      Despite all the mounting scientific concern, the political rhetoric and the clean technology of the past decade, the growth rate in global carbon emissions has not reduced at all. Why? Because we continue to extract and burn fossil fuels more than ever before We have far more oil, coal and gas than we can safely burn. For all the millions of words written about climate change, the challenge ...

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      Mentions: Europe
    9. The Experts: Should There Be a Price on Carbon Emissions?

      The Experts: Should There Be a Price on Carbon Emissions?

      Yes, there should be a price on carbon emissions. Directly pricing carbon dioxide (and other greenhouse gases) provides a far better “bang for the buck” in mitigating climate change than many of the policies that have actually been put in place (such as feed-in tariffs or tax credits for wind and solar or fleet-averaged fuel efficiency standards for automobiles). Unfortunately, policies that dole out money and hide costs are often more politically palatable than policies that make costs explicit.

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    10. Who Should Share the Responsibility for Sustainability?

      Who Should Share the Responsibility for Sustainability?

      About two years ago, in December 2010, I addressed the different changes in our collective thinking that might usher in a sustainable world. It was argued that this depended to a great extent on folks “getting it” with respect to how people view sustainability and their responsibility (personal and corporate – although I understand some [...]

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    11. Why taxing pollution deserves serious discussion

      Why taxing pollution deserves serious discussion

      Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his party have recently attempted to demonize Opposition Leader Tom Mulcair for his alleged advocacy of a “job-killing carbon tax.” As has been widely noted, Mr. Mulcair and the NDP have, in fact, only called for a cap and trade system based on the broader principle of “polluter pay,” which would require major carbon polluters to purchase emission permits from the government or on a carbon market

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      Mentions: Netherlands
    12. Why Is DC Talking About a Carbon Tax Again?

      Why Is DC Talking About a Carbon Tax Again?
      Washington insiders at both ends of the political spectrum have begun talking about a carbon tax. The document "A Progressive Carbon Tax Will Fight Climate Change and Stimulate the Economy" by Richard Caperton of the Democrat-aligned Center for American Progress (CAP) is a little surprising because the assumption since 2009 has been that some version of a market-based cap-and-trade program was the only politically viable way to put a price on carbon emissions. Advocacy for a carbon tax by academ
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    13. Relationships between Sustainability and Economics

      Relationships between Sustainability and Economics

      We’ve been discussing aspects of social impacts and sustainability in my last few articles. I’ve recently come across some excellent discussions on the interrelationship between sustainability and economics. The gist of the discussions is that there is not a trade-off between a sustainable business model or sustainable manufacturing and profit – one can minimize the [...]

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    14. California Tackles Climate Change, But Will Others Follow?

      California Tackles Climate Change, But Will Others Follow?

      Can California save the planet? The state that has instigated every key U.S. effort to curb fossil-fuel emissions since the 1960s now will tackle the greatest challenge of all—reining in greenhouse gases—with a cap-and-trade system launched this week. In a closed three-hour auction conducted online Wednesday, California's energy companies and large manufacturers placed their bids for 62 million permits that essentially give them the right to pollute. Using these chits and a healthy number of fre

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      Mentions: Europe Barack Obama
    15. Renewables Growing Fastest But Can't Compete Without Help: BP

      Renewables Growing Fastest But Can't Compete Without Help: BP

      Renewable forms of energy are growing far faster than any other form of energy, a BP economist said in Chicago last week, but are unlikely to significantly impact the world’s reliance on fossil fuels without continued government interventions, such as a price on carbon. The world’s oil consumption grew by less than 1 percent in 2011, natural gas by 2 percent, coal by about 5 percent, and nuclear reactors contributed 4 percent less energy in the wake of the Fukushima disaster, according to Mark Finley, BP’s general manager for global energy markets.

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    1-24 of 166 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 »
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